C’mon Wear Those Shoes, Don’t Hide that Talent!

So I got the shoes in this post’s featured image in October 2015. ‘Big deal,’ you snicker. I have never worn them since I bought them. Did I just hear a ‘wowu?’

You see, I got the shoes at a budget-friendly price at the time and hey, they are white too, why not save them for that appropriate time instead of having to scrub them clean all the time. So I kept them in the accompanying box, all nice and wrapped…

This evening, as I was ‘lazying’ on my bed catching up on my social media, I remembered my shoes, took them out of the box on a whim and voila, discovered that they have started showing signs of cracking though this is not noticeable from the featured image…

Which brings me to my point, that when we get an opportunity, there is no need to cower, waiting for the most opportune time to show forth, let’s seize every moment and make it count. Let’s stretch our talents to bear forth more talents and not hide them in the ground  so that they diminish in value like that unwise servant did and dare I say, what I had done to my shoes till now…

‘Cos you know what? Life is short and is only for the living. So live life, within reasonable limits I may add.

Wear those shoes and walk comfortably in them as I sure am gonna do with the ones in the featured image.

Cheers to walking comfortably in our shoes.

Adefolake

*image credit: my ‘Phone Cam

Soldier Go, Soldier Come…

There’s a saying that goes: ‘one man’s loss is another man’s gain.’ This saying is similarly (sometimes satirically) captured with phrases like: one man’s meat is another man’s poison; one man’s trash is another man’s treasure or as a common lingua in my clime goes, ‘soldier go, soldier come but barrack must to remain.’

The phrases above, capture the essence of the thoughts that opportunities lurk in every corner and our abilities to actualise these opportunities depends on our mindsets. In a work scenario for instance, while an employer may bemoan the unexpected resignation of a valued employee, the void created by that loss as it were, provides ample room for growth of other employees and depending on how such remaining employees play their cards, may make them become more valuable and potentially surpass in value-add, the employee who has moved on. The same principle rings true in different spheres of life and I can personally relate in more than one instance.

When such opportunities are presented, one can either take the stance of seeing the same glass as half empty or half full. At the end of the day, our perspectives on life issues we experience, determine whether we make the best (or worst) of them.

One fact of life however, is that soldier go, soldier come, barrack must to remain. The barrack had therefore best equip itself to prepare the remaining soldiers (and those who will join), to succeed at wars.

Warm regards,

Adefolake

*image credit: http://www.google.com